1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
Invited Review Article: Accurate and fast nanopositioning with piezoelectric tube scanners: Emerging trends and future challenges
Rent:
Rent this article for
USD
10.1063/1.2957649
/content/aip/journal/rsi/79/7/10.1063/1.2957649
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/79/7/10.1063/1.2957649
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Side view and top view of a piezoelectric tube scanner with quartered external electrodes and a continuous inner electrode.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Sensorless control of a piezoelectric tube scanner: (a) strain voltage induced in one electrode is used for feedback; (b) one of the electrodes is shunted to an impedance.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Frequency response of a piezoelectric tube scanner with quartered external electrodes and a single inner electrode. The arrangement is similar to Fig. 2(b). One of the electrodes is taken as the input. The lateral deflection of the tube was measured by a noncontact capacitive sensor with a bandwidth of . The apparent phase roll-off is due to the presence of a second order Butterworth low-pass filter in the capacitive sensor.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

In order to force the scanner to trace a raster pattern (c) in the plane, a triangular signal (a) is applied to the fast axis and a psuedoramp signal (b) is applied to the slow axis.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Open-loop lateral movement of a piezoelectric tube scanner when driven by (a) , (b) , and (c) signals. The actuator was driven by a charge source, and thus no sign of hysteresis can be observed in these plots.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Hysteresis plots of a piezoelectric tube scanner driven by voltage and charge signals. The use of a charge source significantly diminishes the presence of nonlinearity.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Electrical circuit representing a piezoelectric tube scanner under (a) symmetrical and (b) asymmetrical actuations.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Frequency response of a piezoelectric tube scanner with quartered external electrodes and a single inner electrode. One of the electrodes is taken as the input. The voltage induced in the opposite electrode, due to the piezoelectric effect, is measured directly by a spectrum analyzer over a bandwidth of . Note that the first two poles of this transfer function are identical to the displacement frequency response of the tube in Fig. 3. However, the two transfer functions have different zeros. Moreover, the third mode that is missing from Fig. 3 is the piston mode of the tube.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

The two frequency responses represent the lateral deflection of the free end of the tube measured by a capacitive sensor (–) and the piezoelectric voltage induced in the opposite electrode (--).

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Schematics of a two-sensor-based tracking controller for a piezoelectric tube scanner. The capacitive sensor’s signal is low pass filtered to reduce its stochastic noise component, thus limiting its use to dc and low frequencies where the piezoelectric displacement signal is not reliable. The controller is designed to track a reference signal illustrated as a triangular waveform.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Closed-loop lateral movement of a piezoelectric tube scanner when driven by (a) , (b) , and (c) signals.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

An alternative approach to the arrangement in Fig. 10. The two complementary sensor signals are “fused” together using a Kalman filter. The optimal estimate of the position is then used for feedback.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

Electrical equivalent of a piezoelectric tube scanner. One side of the tube is driven by the tracking signal while the opposite side is shunted to an impedance. An impedance, when tuned to the tube’s first resonance frequency, is known to result in a better damped system.

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

Feedback structure of a shunted piezoelectric tube scanner. Note that the shunted tube is equivalent to a collocated tube under the feedback controller (8).

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

Both sides of a piezoelectric tube scanner can be used simultaneously for actuation and damping. The signal applied to the shunted electrode is inverted, using an inverting amplifier with a unity gain, and applied to the opposite electrode.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/aip/journal/rsi/79/7/10.1063/1.2957649
2008-07-21
2014-04-16
Loading

Full text loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Invited Review Article: Accurate and fast nanopositioning with piezoelectric tube scanners: Emerging trends and future challenges
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/79/7/10.1063/1.2957649
10.1063/1.2957649
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM