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Surface indentation arrays for high-throughput analysis of viscoelastic material properties
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10.1063/1.3247905
/content/aip/journal/rsi/80/10/10.1063/1.3247905
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/80/10/10.1063/1.3247905
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

(a) Schematic of indenting geometry for a single sphere on a polymer surface, where the radius, , and load, , are known from the sphere properties. The contact radius, , determines the shear compliance, , of the polymer substrate. (b) Microscope images of a contact areas from two different sphere types on the same sample substrate with contact diameter of and . (c) View of an indenter array on a polymer surface, without the attached motion stage.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Kraton creep compliance measured over 16.7 h using surface indentation and tensile creep measurements. Both experiments were performed at , with error bars removed from the tensile experiment for clarity. Error bars are standard error with 95% confidence intervals.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Creep compliance measured to 68 h using surface indentation on a step gradient comprised of three formulations: 45/55%, 50/50%, 55/45% LMA/IBoMA by mass fraction. Measurements were performed simultaneously on all three compositions at , with error bars smaller than the data points. Error bars are standard error with 95% confidence intervals.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Creep compliance measured to 68 h using surface indentation on a step gradient consisting of three formulations: 55/45% mass fraction LMA/IBoMA with 0%, 0.5%, and 1% mass fraction HDDMA. Measurements were performed simultaneously on all three compositions at , with error bars smaller than the data points. Error bars are standard error with 95% confidence intervals.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Creep compliance from temperature gradient experiments for 50/50% by mass IBoMA/LMA. The temperature experiment measured for 68 h as compared to 2.6 h for the temperature gradient experiments, measured at ten temperatures: 24, 27, 30, 33, 38, 41, 44, 48, 51, and .

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Creep compliance master curve for 50/50% by mass IBoMA/LMA using time-temperature superposition. Shift factors are given in Fig. 7, with all curves shifted to a time corresponding to a reference temperature of .

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Shift factors, , for 50/50% by mass IBoMA/LMA, with WLF predicted shift factors using as the reference temperature. WLF predictions are shown for each temperature, fitted only with the shift factors above with WLF constants of and .

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/content/aip/journal/rsi/80/10/10.1063/1.3247905
2009-10-30
2014-04-21
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Surface indentation arrays for high-throughput analysis of viscoelastic material properties
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/80/10/10.1063/1.3247905
10.1063/1.3247905
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