1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
Thermoelastic analysis of a silicon surface under x-ray free-electron-laser irradiation
Rent:
Rent this article for
USD
10.1063/1.3455203
/content/aip/journal/rsi/81/7/10.1063/1.3455203
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/81/7/10.1063/1.3455203

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

A conceptual optical system. The half-space is under vacuum; the half-space is an infinite silicon slab. The center of a short pulse of soft x-ray radiation produced far away in the remote past reaches the surface at . Part of it penetrates the material medium, while part of it is reflected.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Reflectivity of a silicon ideal surface for glancing incidence at an angle of 30 mrad, as calculated by XOP2.0 (Refs. 4 and 7).

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Temperature distribution at fixed moments inside the silicon slab after normal incidence of a Gaussian radiant energy pulse. The slab is supposed to be at before irradiation. Notice that as long as the heat front has time to advance just a distance z small compared to the Gaussian radius , the heat flow is essentially one dimensional. For longer times, the heat flow becomes three dimensional, the energy dissipates much more rapidly, and the maximum temperature tends to zero.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Temperature distribution at fixed points inside the silicon slab after normal incidence of a Gaussian radiant energy pulse. The slab is supposed to be at before irradiation.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Silicon surface normal displacement at the center of the silicon hot spot after normal incidence of a Gaussian radiant energy pulse. Notice that at very short times the surface displacement is very small, in agreement with the simple estimates discussed in Secs. II and IV. So, for single pulse operation, there is no optical aberration related to thermal effects. However, at , the surface bulges out by more than 1 nm, and the surface figure error can become significant, a question of concern for operation with pulse trains if the pulses are closely spaced.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Silicon surface normal displacement , after normal incidence of a Gaussian radiant energy pulse, as a function of the radial distance from the center of the silicon hot spot. This is shown for three different instants of time: 40, 200, and 1000 ns after pulse arrival at the silicon surface.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

(Silicon surface normal displacement required to satisfy the boundary condition of “free surface” at and the resulting total displacement, at . From the figure, we see that for , the surface figure error is , which is larger than presently attainable surface quality and would therefore significantly degrade optical performance.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

FEL characteristics.

Generic image for table
Table II.

Silicon general properties.

Generic image for table
Table III.

Thermoelastic constants for silicon.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/aip/journal/rsi/81/7/10.1063/1.3455203
2010-07-08
2014-04-17
Loading

Full text loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Thermoelastic analysis of a silicon surface under x-ray free-electron-laser irradiation
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/81/7/10.1063/1.3455203
10.1063/1.3455203
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM