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An experimental methodology to relate local strain to microstructural texture
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10.1063/1.3474902
/content/aip/journal/rsi/81/8/10.1063/1.3474902
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/81/8/10.1063/1.3474902

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

(a) A uniaxial loading specimen showing the region of interest as a red rectangle. (b) Vickers indentation marks on the polished specimen viewed with the optical microscope. (c) Results of the EBSD scan showing grain geometry and orientation in relation to the same Vickers indentation marks as in (b).

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Relative image sizes at several magnifications. The region of interest is imaged at high resolution using an array of high magnification images to cover the region outlined by the indentation marks.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

(a) Contour plot of the strain field with overlaid grain boundaries. The reference and deformed images are a composite of 316 images at 31× magnification (ex situ). (b) A portion of the contour plot in (a) is magnified to show the strain localizations that can be resolved with this technique. Note the arrows indicating localization at a twin and a grain boundary. (c) Grain orientation map of the region shown in (b). (d) Contour plot of the strain field at low magnification (5×) of the same region shown in (a). Note that the subset size in (b) is much smaller than the one used in (d), which results in higher resolution fields with subgrain level accuracy.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Contour plot of the strain field around the tip of a fatigue crack with overlaid grain boundaries (a combination of 112 DIC results at 50× magnification). Only the upper half of the field is shown here to increase the detail that can be seen (note the upper three of five indentation marks). (b) A portion of the contour plot is magnified to show the strain localizations that can be resolved with this technique. Note the strain concentrations on two grain boundaries indicated by arrows. (c) Grain orientation map of the region shown in part (b).

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

DIC strain artifacts due to stitching error for a set of four images. No loading took place between the reference and deformed images. The specimen was simply removed and reinserted into the microscope. Strain artifacts [Figs. 3(c) and 3(d)] appear because the relative displacement between each corresponding reference and deformed image in the set is different [Figs. 3(a) and 3(b)].

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Contour plots of strain fields at various global strain levels created by stitching 15 images together before correlating. Strain fields with global strains of (a) 0.23%, (b) 0.36%, (c) 1.08%, and (d) 3.04%. As global strain increases, strain artifacts due to stitching become less dominant. Stitching strains become negligible around 1% global strain.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Measurement resolution properties at several magnifications for a camera with a pixel size of .

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/content/aip/journal/rsi/81/8/10.1063/1.3474902
2010-08-23
2014-04-19
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: An experimental methodology to relate local strain to microstructural texture
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/81/8/10.1063/1.3474902
10.1063/1.3474902
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