1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
Photoacoustic absorption spectrometer for highly transparent dielectrics with parts-per-million sensitivity
Rent:
Rent this article for
USD
10.1063/1.4792724
/content/aip/journal/rsi/84/2/10.1063/1.4792724
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/84/2/10.1063/1.4792724
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Experimental setup: Light pulses are generated and focused onto a sample. A piezo transducer is attached to the sample to measure the acoustic signal.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Typical photoacoustic signal measured with the piezo transducer, the sample is an undoped congruent lithium niobate crystal with dimensions mm3. The distance between transducer and illuminated cylinder is 40 mm, leading to a delay of τdelay = r/v = 6.5 μs. The measured quantity is the maximal voltage of the first peak U PhAc, called the photoacoustic voltage.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

The photoacoustic voltage rises linearly with pulse energy, shown here for a lithium triborate crystal and y-polarized light at 1600 nm wavelength.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Photoacoustic signal for an LBO crystal, top: crystallographic axis points onto the piezo, bottom: axis points onto the piezo.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Calibration: The photoacoustic measurement is compared to the absorption spectrum measured with a FTIR spectrometer. The comparison yields the calibration coefficient, to convert the normalized photoacoustic signal into absorption coefficients.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Photoacoustic absorption spectrum of an LBO crystal (sample 4) for light polarized along the crystallographic y axis.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Comparison of photoacoustic absorption spectra of LBO crystals from different growers for light polarized along the crystallographic y axis.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Calibration: The absorption band of the fundamental OH vibration can be measured with a standard grating spectrophotometer.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Calibration: The absorption band of the overtone of the OH vibration can be measured with the photoacoustic spectrometer. The ratio of the oscillator strengths between fundamental and overtone vibration is known from literature.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Photoacoustic signal of a LiNbO3 crystal versus laser pulse energy at 532 nm wavelength. For high pulse energies two-photon absorption dominates linear absorption.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Absorption spectrum of an undoped LiNbO3 crystal for ordinary and extraordinary polarization, measured with the photoacoustic absorption spectrometer.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Absorption spectrum of a 5 mol.% MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystal for ordinary and extraordinary light polarization, measured with the photoacoustic absorption spectrometer.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

Absorption bands of a 5 mol.% MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystal between 2000 and 2500 nm wavelength.

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

Absorption spectra of α-BBO measured with the photoacoustic setup and with a FTIR spectrometer.

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

Absorption spectrum of an α-BBO crystal for ordinary light polarization, (a) in semi-logarithmic scale, (b) in linear ordinate scale. Absorption bands at 1800, 1960, and 2090 nm are measured with the photoacoustic setup.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/aip/journal/rsi/84/2/10.1063/1.4792724
2013-02-26
2014-04-17
Loading

Full text loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Photoacoustic absorption spectrometer for highly transparent dielectrics with parts-per-million sensitivity
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/rsi/84/2/10.1063/1.4792724
10.1063/1.4792724
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM