1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
Dependence of phonation threshold pressure on vocal tract acoustics and vocal fold tissue mechanics
Rent:
Rent this article for
USD
10.1121/1.2173516
/content/asa/journal/jasa/119/4/10.1121/1.2173516
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/119/4/10.1121/1.2173516
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

A body-cover model of the vocal fold in the midcoronal section for linearized theoretical analysis of small-amplitude oscillation, with mucosal wave propagation and coupling to a supraglottal vocal tract (epilarynx tube). The vocal folds are shown in prephonatory positions (with prephonatory glottal half-width and tissue displacement ). The dotted lines indicate mucosal wave motion like a rotating plate in a bar-plate model (Titze and Story, 2002).

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Cross-sectional schematic of the physical model of the larynx with the simulated vocal fold cover, body, and the rectangular glottal airway, showing a rectangular prephonatory glottal geometry (not to scale). The transverse dimension of the airway is . A biomaterial simulating a thick superficial layer of the lamina propria is directly implanted into the vocal fold cover bounded by the epithelium and the vocal fold body.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Schematic of the physical model of the larynx with coupling to a rectangular uniform-tube supraglottal vocal tract (not to scale).

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Phonation threshold pressure (onset and offset ) of the physical model as a function of prephonatory glottal half-width , with the biomaterial hyaluronic acid (0.01% and 0.1% HA) implanted into the vocal fold cover.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Phonation threshold pressure (onset and offset ) of the physical model as a function of prephonatory glottal half-width , with the biomaterials hyaluronic acid (0.01% and 0.1% HA) and fibronectin (0.033%) implanted into the vocal fold cover.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Phonation threshold pressure (onset and offset ) of the physical model as a function of prephonatory glottal half-width , with the biomaterials hyaluronic acid (0.01% HA) and fibronectin (0.033%) implanted into the vocal fold cover.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Phonation threshold pressure (onset and offset ) of the physical model as a function of prephonatory glottal half-width , with the biomaterials hyaluronic acid (0.1% HA) and fibronectin (0.033%) implanted into the vocal fold cover.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Phonation threshold pressure (onset and offset ) of the physical model as a function of prephonatory glottal half-width , with and without a uniform-tube vocal tract.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Viscous shear modulus of sodium hyaluronate (HA) in phosphate buffered solution (H 7.0) at four concentrations, from human umbilical cords (from Chan and Titze, 1999a).

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Phonation threshold pressure as a function of prephonatory glottal half-width as predicted from Eq. (30), based on the viscoelastic data of 0.01% and 0.1% hyaluronic acid (HA) reported in Chan and Titze (1999a). Also shown are empirical values of onset and offset of the physical model with 0.01% and 0.1% HA implanted into the vocal fold cover.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/asa/journal/jasa/119/4/10.1121/1.2173516
2006-04-01
2014-04-19
Loading

Full text loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Dependence of phonation threshold pressure on vocal tract acoustics and vocal fold tissue mechanics
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/119/4/10.1121/1.2173516
10.1121/1.2173516
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM