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Auditory and nonauditory factors affecting speech reception in noise by older listeners
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10.1121/1.2642072
/content/asa/journal/jasa/121/4/10.1121/1.2642072
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/121/4/10.1121/1.2642072

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Median pure-tone hearing thresholds (re: ISO-389-1991 ) and 5th and 95th percentiles for the normal-hearing (NH, ) and the hearing-impaired (HI, ) participants.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Typical stimuli to measure the text reception threshold (TRT): a sentence masked by a vertical bar pattern. Between sentences, the degree of masking was adaptively varied. The field back color was white, text color was red, and the color of the mask was black. The shown percentages of unmasked text are 28%, 40%, 52%, 64%, and 76%, respectively. Here, a Dutch sentence from the lists by Versfeld et al. (2000) was translated into English. Adopted from Zekveld et al. (2007) .

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

SRT in stationary noise ( , left) and in block-modulated noise ( , right) as a function of pure-tone average (PTA), for the normal-hearing (NH, ) and hearing-impaired (HI, ) participants. Also shown are the correlation coefficients and their significance: (ns) nonsignificant; (*) ; (**) ; (***) .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

SRT in stationary noise ( , left) and in block-modulated noise ( , right) as a function of temporal resolution , for the normal-hearing (NH, ) and the hearing-impaired (HI, ) participants. Correlations and significances indicated as in Fig. 3 .

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

SRT in stationary noise ( , left) and in block-modulated noise ( , right) as a function of text reception threshold for text masked with a vertical bar pattern (TRT), for the normal-hearing (NH, ) and the hearing-impaired (HI, ) participants. The dashed lines are linear regression lines fitted on the data of the normal-hearing participants. Correlations and significances indicated as in Fig. 3 .

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE I.

Group averages , standard deviations , reliabilities , standard errors of measurement (SEM), and two-tailed t-statistics of the test outcomes for the normal-hearing (NH) and the hearing-impaired (HI) participants. Test reliabilities have been calculated from test-retest correlations using the Spearman-Brown formula: ), cf. Nunnally, 1967 . SEM is defined as . Group differences are considered significant if .

Generic image for table
TABLE II.

Product-moment correlations between the predictor variables and SRT in stationary noise and SRT in modulated noise . All correlations are calculated separately for the normal-hearing (NH) and the hearing-impaired (HI) participants. Significant correlations are displayed in bold, values are denoted by asterisks: ; ; .

Generic image for table
TABLE III.

Product-moment cross correlations between the predictor variables. Only data from the hearing-impaired participants were included in the calculations. Significant correlations are displayed in bold, values are denoted by asterisks, indicated as in Table II .

Generic image for table
TABLE IV.

Results from the stepwise multiple regression analyses: significant contributors to explaining the variance in SRT in stationary noise and SRT in modulated noise . The analysis was performed only on the data from the hearing-impaired participants . Shown are the successive contributing predictor variables and the percentage of the variance that they significantly account for when included in the model, either on their own or cumulatively combined (cum. ). Both measures are corrected for the available degrees of freedom. All shown models have a significance .

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/content/asa/journal/jasa/121/4/10.1121/1.2642072
2007-04-01
2014-04-20
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Auditory and nonauditory factors affecting speech reception in noise by older listeners
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/121/4/10.1121/1.2642072
10.1121/1.2642072
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