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Evoking biphone neighborhoods with verbal transformations: Illusory changes demonstrate both lexical competition and inhibition
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/content/asa/journal/jasa/123/3/10.1121/1.2839069
2008-02-14
2014-04-21

Abstract

When a recorded verbal stimulus repeats over and over, perceptual changes occur and listeners hear competing forms. These verbal transformations (VTs) were obtained for a phonemically related set of 24 consonant-vowel syllables that varied widely in frequency-weighted neighborhood density (FWND). Listener’s initial transformations involving substitution of consonants versus vowels were strongly correlated with the lexical substitution neighborhood [, ]. Interestingly, as stimulus FWND increased, average time spent hearing illusory forms substantially decreased [, ]. These results suggest that VTs not only reveal underlying competitors, but also provide a highly sensitive measure of lexical inhibition.

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Scitation: Evoking biphone neighborhoods with verbal transformations: Illusory changes demonstrate both lexical competition and inhibition
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/123/3/10.1121/1.2839069
10.1121/1.2839069
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