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Identification of some perceptual dimensions underlying loudspeaker dissimilarities
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10.1121/1.2916688
/content/asa/journal/jasa/123/6/10.1121/1.2916688
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/123/6/10.1121/1.2916688

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Frequency responses of the 12 tested loudspeakers (Table II), measured in the configuration used for the recordings.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Dendrogram resulting from the cluster analysis of the similarities between listeners (listening test involving the musical excerpt McCoy Tyner). Each number corresponds to one of the 27 listeners. The height of the node connecting two listeners corresponds to the dissimilarity of their judgments, whereas the position of the listeners on the horizontal axis is irrelevant.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Two-dimensional spaces resulting from the MDS analysis of the perceptual dissimilarities obtained with each musical excerpt (McCoy Tyner, Kan’nida, and Vivaldi). Each loudspeaker is identified by its number (Table II).

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Examples of acoustical spaces based on the waveform (top) and the power spectral density (bottom). They should be compared to the corresponding perceptual spaces of Fig. 3.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Examples of acoustical spaces based on the overall specific loudness. They should be compared to the corresponding perceptual spaces of Fig. 3.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Examples of acoustical spaces based on the temporal mean of time-varying specific loudness 2. They should be compared to the corresponding perceptual spaces of Fig. 3.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Bass/treble balance as a function of the dimension 1 of the acoustical space based on the temporal mean of time-varying specific loudness 2. Top: case leading to the best correlation between dimension and attribute (Kan’nida, left channel). Bottom: case leading to the worst correlation between dimension and attribute (Vivaldi, right channel). Each loudspeaker is identified by its number (Table II).

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Medium emergence as a function of the dimension 2 of the acoustical space based on the temporal mean of time-varying specific loudness 2. Top: case leading to the best correlation between dimension and attribute (McCoy Tyner, right channel). Bottom: case leading to the worst correlation between dimension and attribute (Kan’nida, left channel).

Tables

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TABLE I.

Reverberation time RT measured by third-octave bands in the listening room used for the recordings as a function of the central frequency of the third-octave band.

Generic image for table
TABLE II.

General characteristics of the 12 tested loudspeakers.

Generic image for table
TABLE III.

Correlation coefficient between the bass/treble balance and the dimension 1 of the acoustical space based on the temporal mean of time-varying specific loudness 2, for the left and right channels of the recordings and the three musical excerpts.

Generic image for table
TABLE IV.

Correlation coefficient between the medium emergence and the dimension 2 of the acoustical space based on the temporal mean of time-varying specific loudness 2, for the left and right channels of the recordings and the three musical excerpts.

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/content/asa/journal/jasa/123/6/10.1121/1.2916688
2008-06-01
2014-04-17
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Identification of some perceptual dimensions underlying loudspeaker dissimilarities
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/123/6/10.1121/1.2916688
10.1121/1.2916688
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