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Across-talker effects on non-native listeners’ vowel perception in noisea)
a)Portions of this work were previously presented at the 154th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, New Orleans, LA, November 2007 and the 156th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Miami, FL, November 2008.
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10.1121/1.3493428
/content/asa/journal/jasa/128/5/10.1121/1.3493428
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/128/5/10.1121/1.3493428

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Average identification accuracy scores for each of the 7 listeners in each group. Each point represents one listener’s score averaged across talkers and across vowels. The three signal-to-noise ratios are shown on the -axis.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

[(a), (b), (c)] Intelligibility scores for 10 talkers at the three different signal-to-noise ratios of −3, −5 and −8 dB in Figs. 2(a), 3(b), and 2(c), respectively. American English listeners’ scores are shown on the -axis and Korean listeners on the -axis. Each data point represents one talker.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

plot for two highly confusable vowel pairs for the female talkers. Duration is indicated by the size of the symbol with longer vowel durations having larger symbols.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

plot for two highly confusable vowel pairs for the male talkers. Duration is indicated by the size of the symbol with longer vowel durations having larger symbols.

Tables

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TABLE I.

Confusion matrix for the American English listeners. Percent identification scores are averaged across talkers and signal-to-noise ratios.

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TABLE II.

Confusion matrix for native Korean listeners. Bolded cells indicate vowel pairs that are further explored for individual talkers. Percent identification scores are averaged across talkers and signal-to-noise ratios.

Generic image for table
TABLE III.

Confusion matrices for each of the 10 talkers. Korean listeners’ responses, in percent identification, are shown for two pairs of vowels that showed high degrees of confusability for the Korean listeners but relatively stable identification for the AE listeners.

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/content/asa/journal/jasa/128/5/10.1121/1.3493428
2010-11-24
2014-04-17
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Across-talker effects on non-native listeners’ vowel perception in noisea)
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/128/5/10.1121/1.3493428
10.1121/1.3493428
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