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/content/asa/journal/jasa/128/5/10.1121/1.3499700
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/content/asa/journal/jasa/128/5/10.1121/1.3499700
2010-11-11
2016-09-27

Abstract

This article investigates using real-time magnetic resonance imaging the vocal tract shaping of 5 soprano singers during the production of two-octave scales of sung vowels. A systematic shift of the first vocal tract resonance frequency with respect to the fundamental is shown to exist for high vowels across all subjects. No consistent systematic effect on the vocal tract resonance could be shown across all of the subjects for other vowels or for the second vocal tract resonance.

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