1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
oa
Effects of natural sounds on the perception of road traffic noise
Rent:
Rent this article for
Access full text Article
/content/asa/journal/jasa/129/4/10.1121/1.3567073
1.
1. M. E. Nilsson, J. Alvarsson, M. Rådsten-Ekman, and K. Bolin, “Auditory masking of wanted and unwanted sounds in a city park,” Noise Control Eng. J. 58, 524531 (2010).
http://dx.doi.org/10.3397/1.3484182
2.
2. K. Bolin, M. E. Nilsson, and S. Khan, “The potential of natural sounds to mask wind turbine noise,” Acta Acust. Acust. 96, 131137 (2010).
http://dx.doi.org/10.3813/AAA.918264
3.
3. J. Y. Jeon, P. J. Lee, J. You, and J. Kang, “Perceptual assessment of quality of urban soundscapes with combined noise sources and water sounds,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 13571366 (2010).
http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.3298437
4.
4. G. R. Watts, R. J. Pheasant, K. V. Horoshenkov, and L. Ragonesi, “Measurement and subjective assessment of water generated sounds,” Acta Acust. Acust. 95, 10321039 (2009).
http://dx.doi.org/10.3813/AAA.918235
5.
5. J. You, P. J. Lee, and J. Y. Jeon, “Evaluating water sounds to improve the soundscape of urban areas affected by traffic noise,” Noise Control Eng. J. 58, 477483 (2010).
http://dx.doi.org/10.3397/1.3484183
6.
6. B. De Coensel, A. Bockstael, L. Dekoninck, D. Botteldooren, B. Schulte-Fortkamp, J. Kang, and M. E. Nilsson, “The soundscape approach for early stage urban planning: A case study,” in Proceedings of Internoise (Lisbon, Portugal, 2010), p. 504.
7.
7. N. Durlach, “Auditory masking: Need for improved conceptual structure,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 17871790 (2006).
http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.2335426
8.
8. R. A. Bradley and M. E. Terry, “Rank analysis of incomplete block designs: I. The method of paired comparisons,” Biometrika 39, 324345 (1952).
9.
9. R. D. Luce, Individual Choice Behavior: A Theoretical Analysis (Wiley, New York, 1959).
10.
10. O. Dykstra, Jr., “Rank analysis of incomplete block designs: A method of paired comparisons employing unequal repetitions on pairs,” Biometrics 16, 176188 (1960).
http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2527550
11.
11. W. Ellermeier, M. Mader, and P. Daniel, “Scaling the unpleasantness of sounds according to the BTL model: Ratio-scale representation and psychoacoustical analysis,” Acta Acust. Acust. 90, 101107 (2004).
12.
12. F. Wickelmaier and C. Schmid, “A Matlab function to estimate choice model parameters from paired-comparison data,” Behav. Res. Methods Instrum. Comput. 36, 2940 (2004).
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BF03195547
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/129/4/10.1121/1.3567073
Loading

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.

Click to view

FIG. 1.

(a) Estimated BTL scale values for the loudness of the traffic sound (arbitrary units), based on a total of 30 (paired comparisons) × 100 (participants) = 3000 judgments; (b) average pleasantness and eventfulness for the semantic differential (SD) test, based on 100 judgments for each stimulus. The error bars denote the 95% confidence intervals; the stars denote significant loudness reductions or pleasantness/eventfulness improvements (α = 0:05) as compared to the baseline stimulus (labeled “O”).

Tables

Generic image for table

Click to view

TABLE I.

Composition and acoustical parameters of the stimuli (energetic average between left and right ear) together with the BTL scale values of the paired comparison test (loudness of road traffic noise) and the aggregated results of the semantic differential test (pleasantness and eventfulness of overall soundscape).

Generic image for table

Click to view

TABLE II.

Cumulative paired comparison matrix. Absolute frequencies are given with which the road traffic noise of the stimulus in the row was judged to be louder than the road traffic noise of the stimulus in the column.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/asa/journal/jasa/129/4/10.1121/1.3567073
2011-03-28
2014-04-19

Abstract

Recent studies show that introducing sound from water features in urban open spaces may reduce the loudness of road traffic noise, but it is not clear in which situations this measure also improves overall soundscape quality. This work describes a listening experiment on loudness, pleasantness, and eventfulness of stimuli that combine road traffic noise with fountain or bird sound at different sound levels. Adding fountain sound reduced the loudness of road traffic noise only if the latter had low temporal variability. Conversely, adding bird sound significantly enhanced soundscape pleasantness and eventfulness, more than what was achieved by adding fountain sound.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/asa/journal/jasa/129/4/1.3567073.html;jsessionid=mi1l7ab5p4sv.x-aip-live-06?itemId=/content/asa/journal/jasa/129/4/10.1121/1.3567073&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah&containerItemId=content/asa/journal/jasa
true
true
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Effects of natural sounds on the perception of road traffic noise
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/129/4/10.1121/1.3567073
10.1121/1.3567073
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM