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Acoustic-phonetic characteristics of speech produced with communicative intent to counter adverse listening conditionsa)
a)Portions of this work were presented in “Acoustic-phonetic characteristics of naturally elicited clear speech in British English,” a poster presented at the 157th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Portland, OR, 18-22 May 2009; “Acoustic characteristics of clear speech produced in response to three different adverse listening conditions,” a poster presented at the Psycholinguistic Approaches to Speech Recognition in Adverse Conditions Workshop, Bristol, 8-10 March 2010; and “Spot the different speaking styles: Is ‘elicited’ clear speech reflective of clear speech produced with communicative intent?” a poster presented at the British Association of Academic Phoneticians (BAAP) Colloquium 2010, London, 29-31 March 2010.
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10.1121/1.3623753
/content/asa/journal/jasa/130/4/10.1121/1.3623753
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/130/4/10.1121/1.3623753

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

A black and white version of a pair of diapixUK pictures that are part of the “farm” theme. Twelve differences have to be found between the two pictures.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Diagram showing the order of presentation of the different experimental conditions over the five sessions. In the diapix sessions, “B,” “F,” and “S” denote beach, farm, and street scenes, respectively. There were four different diapix picture sets for each of these three themes.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Box-plots showing percent change in median F0, F0 range, and mid-frequency energy in the 1–3 kHz region (ME 1-3k) for the VOC (VOC) and BABBLE (BAB) conditions relative to the same talker’s speech in the NB (“no barrier”) condition.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Box-plots showing percent change in mean word duration (MWD), vowel F1, and vowel F2 range for the VOC (VOC) and BABBLE (BAB) conditions relative to the same talker’s speech in the diapix NB (“no barrier”) condition.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Scatterplot showing the percent change (relative to the NB condition) for F0 range in the VOC and BABBLE conditions for individual talkers. For all but one talker, there is greater change in F0 range for the BABBLE than for the VOC condition.

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE I.

Mean time in seconds taken for talker pairs to find the first eight differences for each of the pictures in the NB (“no barrier”), VOC, and BABBLE conditions. Standard deviation measures are given in italics. Three pictures were presented per condition.

Generic image for table
TABLE II.

Median F0 (in semitones re 1 Hz), F0 range (interquartile range in semitones re 1 Hz), mean energy in the mid-frequency region of the long-term average spectrum (in dB), mean word duration (in ms) and vowel F1 and F2 range (in ERB) for male (N = 20) and female (N = 20) talkers in the diapix NB and VOC conditions, and the two conditions involving read sentences (read, conversational and read, clear).

Generic image for table
TABLE III.

Median F0 (in semitones), F0 range (interquartile range in semitones), mean energy in the mid-frequency region of the long-term average spectrum (in dB), mean word duration (in ms), and vowel F1 and F2 range (in ERB) for the speech produced by the same group of male (N = 11) and female (N = 9) normal-hearing (NH) talkers in the NB, VOC, and BABBLE diapix conditions. Standard deviations are given in parentheses.

Generic image for table
TABLE IV.

Paired-samples t-tests on the measures of percent change (relative to the NB condition) in F0 range, median F0, mean word duration, mid frequency energy (ME 1-3 kHz), F1 and F2 range in the VOC and BABBLE conditions for the group of 20 NH talkers.

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/content/asa/journal/jasa/130/4/10.1121/1.3623753
2011-10-03
2014-04-21
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Acoustic-phonetic characteristics of speech produced with communicative intent to counter adverse listening conditionsa)
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/130/4/10.1121/1.3623753
10.1121/1.3623753
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