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Apparent auditory source width insensitivity in older hearing-impaired individuals
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10.1121/1.4728200
/content/asa/journal/jasa/132/1/10.1121/1.4728200
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/132/1/10.1121/1.4728200
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Pure-tone audiometric thresholds as a function of frequency for Experiment I. Gray lines show an individual participant’s better-ear (based on variable pure-tone threshold average) audiogram. Black lines show median thresholds for left (crosses) and right (circles) ears. Error bars show first and third quartile ranges.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Pure-tone audiometric thresholds as a function of frequency for Experiment II. Gray lines show an individual participant’s better-ear (based on variable pure-tone threshold average) audiogram. Black lines show median thresholds for left (crosses) and right (circles) ears. Error bars show first and third quartile ranges.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

User interface for Experiment IIIb, the closed-set identification task. Participants were asked to select the position (row) and width (column) of the displayed image that best represented the stimulus they heard.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Mean IC difference (ΔIC) thresholds as a function of reference IC for older (filled) and younger (open) participants at global ITDs of −312 (left triangle), 0 (circle), and +312 (right triangle) μs. The dashed line is the average data from Pollack and Trittipoe (1959). Error bars show ±1 standard error. IC discrimination was significantly worse for older participants across reference ICs. There were no significant differences between ITDs for either age group.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

The left panel (a) shows individual IC difference (ΔIC) thresholds for unity (1) reference IC as a function of a participants age. Adjusted partial correlations (r) of thresholds and age controlling for better-ear four-frequency average hearing loss were statistically significant for the older HI participants (p < 0.05). The linear regression is shown for older (solid) participants. The right panel (b) shows individual ΔIC thresholds for unity (1) reference IC as a function of better-ear variable pure-tone threshold averages (BEA). Adjusted partial correlations of ΔIC thresholds and BEA controlling for age were not significant for the older HI participants. The linear regression is shown for older HI participants.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Individual IC difference (ΔIC) thresholds as a function of the participants age for Experiment II. The adjusted partial correlation (r) of ΔIC thresholds and age controlling for BEA were statistically significant (p < 0.01); the correlation of ΔIC thresholds and BEA controlling for age were not significant. The linear regression of ΔIC threshold and age is shown.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Example of Experiment III results for a younger NH participant, aged 38 years, BEA of 6.7 dB HL, showing aggregated images as a function of position (horizontal labels) and IC (vertical labels). Levels of gray indicate the frequency of response for that pixel. The mean and standard deviation of image widths relative to the head width is given at the bottom of each frame.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Example of Experiment III results for an older HI participant, aged 68 years, BEA of 48.3 dB HL, showing accumulated images as a function of position (horizontal labels) and IC (vertical labels). Levels of gray indicate the frequency of response for that pixel. The mean and standard deviation of image widths relative to the head width is given at the bottom of each frame.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Response widths as a function of response centers in pixels for NH (n = 4) and HI (n = 16) participants (rows) and IC (columns) for stimuli with simulated lateral positions of −30° (left triangles), 0° (asterisks), and +30° (right triangles). The rightmost column shows response widths and centers for the monaural (L/R channel only) stimuli. The extent of the mannequin head (360 pixels) affected the response widths for ±30° stimuli. Response centers were more scattered and response widths were less affected by IC for HI relative to NH participants.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

The left panel (a) shows mean results for Experiment IIIa: Mean width in pixels of drawn responses by younger NH and older HI participants as a function of the IC of 0°-position stimuli. Error bars show 95% within-subject confidence intervals. The right panel (b) shows mean results for Experiment IIIb: Mean response IC as a function of stimulus IC for younger NH and older HI participants. Error bars show 95% within-subject confidence intervals. For comparison with panel (a), the ordinate direction has been inverted, so broader images are at the top. Average linear-regression slopes (β) are given for both groups.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Mean IC difference (ΔIC) thresholds as a function of reference IC for younger NH (filled circles) and older HI (open circles) collapsed across ITDs from Experiment I, and modeled older HI thresholds generated from noises based on NH thresholds mixed with independent noises attenuated by 7 dB (crosses) and 9 dB (open squares). The model describes the older HI thresholds well contingent on the independent-noise attenuation chosen.

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/content/asa/journal/jasa/132/1/10.1121/1.4728200
2012-07-10
2014-04-17
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Apparent auditory source width insensitivity in older hearing-impaired individuals
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/132/1/10.1121/1.4728200
10.1121/1.4728200
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