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Quality and loudness judgments for music subjected to compression limitinga)
a)Portions of this work were presented at the 2012 meeting of the American Auditory Society, Scottsdale, AZ, March 8–10, 2012.
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10.1121/1.4730881
/content/asa/journal/jasa/132/2/10.1121/1.4730881
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/132/2/10.1121/1.4730881

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Waveforms of rock and classical music samples. Left panels: unprocessed stimuli. Middle panels: highest amount of compression (−24 dBFS threshold), shown for the UNEQ condition. Right panels: highest amount of compression (−24 dBFS threshold), shown for the LEQ condition.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Example of the response interface. For the loudness scale, the text reads “A is louder,” etc. For the dynamic range scale, the text reads “A has larger loudness changes,” etc. For the pleasantness scale, the text reads “A is more pleasant,” etc.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Wideband amplitude histograms comparing unprocessed rock stimuli to compressed rock stimuli. In each plot, the solid line is for the unprocessed music sample, and the dashed line is for the compressed music sample. The left panels show the UNEQ condition, and the right panels show the LEQ condition.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Wideband amplitude histograms comparing unprocessed classical stimuli to compressed classical stimuli. In each plot, the solid line is for the unprocessed music sample, and the dashed line is for the compressed music sample. The left panels show the UNEQ condition, and the right panels show the LEQ condition.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Dynamic-range histograms, calculated from cumulative amplitude histograms within analysis bands equal to auditory filter bandwidths. Each line in the plot represents the level at which a certain percentage of samples over the duration of the stimulus is not exceeded, across the frequency range from 100 to 10 000 Hz. From top to bottom, the lines represent the following percentages: 98%, 90%, 70%, 50%, and 30%. Both genres are represented in the LEQ and UNEQ conditions, for unprocessed stimuli (“Unp.”) and highly compressed stimuli (−24 dBFS threshold).

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Difference plots showing the dynamic-range difference between the unprocessed stimulus and the −24 dBFS condition, analyzed within auditory filter bandwidths and represented across frequencies from 100 to 10 000 Hz. Dynamic range is defined as the difference between the 30% distribution and the 98% distribution for each stimulus.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Average scores across all subjects for rock music (left panel) and classical music (right panel) in the UNEQ condition. Scores for each of the four quality scales are plotted against the compression threshold conditions. Error bars represent ±1 standard error (S.E.).

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Significant group by compression interactions comparing musicians to non-musicians. Left panel: rock UNEQ condition, with loudness plotted against compression threshold. Right panel: rock UNEQ condition, with dynamic range plotted against compression threshold. Error bars represent ±1 S.E.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Average scores across all subjects for rock music (left panel) and classical music (right panel) in the LEQ condition. Scores for each of the four quality scales are plotted against the compression threshold conditions. Error bars represent ±1 S.E.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Average scores on the preference scale across all subjects, comparing scores in the LEQ condition to scores in the UNEQ condition. Preference scores are plotted against compression threshold. Left panel: rock music. Right panel: classical music. Error bars represent ±1 S.E.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Three listener profiles that emerged on the preference scale in the UNEQ condition. Each panel shows a different profile, and each profile is represented by an individual listener. The left and middle panels (profiles A and B, respectively) are shown for rock music. The right panel (profile C) is shown for classical music.

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE I.

Experimental test blocks.

Generic image for table
TABLE II.

Acoustic properties of unprocessed and compressed stimuli.

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/content/asa/journal/jasa/132/2/10.1121/1.4730881
2012-08-08
2014-04-16
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Quality and loudness judgments for music subjected to compression limitinga)
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/132/2/10.1121/1.4730881
10.1121/1.4730881
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