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Perceptual adaptation to gender and expressive properties in speech: The role of fundamental frequency
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10.1121/1.4792145
/content/asa/journal/jasa/133/4/10.1121/1.4792145
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/133/4/10.1121/1.4792145

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

(Color online) F0 contours for synthesized emotionally expressive test stimuli produced from original recordings of 3 female (top set) and 3 male (bottom set) talkers. Separate lines within each gender category represent average F0 measurements for seven auditory morph proportions (top to bottom from 20:80 to 80:20, angry: happy) along the angry-to-happy expressive speech continua, showing dynamic changes in F0 as a function of morph level.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Adaptation/test trial sequence: Listeners heard four consecutive adaptor stimuli, followed by a 500 ms pause and a single test stimulus. The adaptors originated from different syllables, vowels, and talkers versus the test stimulus.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Experiment 1: Gender adaptation identification functions showing the percentage of “female” responses for each adaptation condition following exposure to (a) F0 present and (b) F0 removed adaptors. Data from 15 different listeners for each F0 condition are included.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Experiment 2: Expressive adaptation identification functions showing the percentage of “angry” responses for each adaptation condition following exposure to (a) F0 present and (b) F0 removed adaptors. Data from 15 different listeners for each F0 condition are included.

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE I.

Experiment 1: Fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequency (F1–F3) midpoint and range (in parentheses) in Hertz (Hz) for F0 present voice gender adaptors. Midpoint measurements were defined as the median of the five values surrounding the midpoint of the voiced portion of the first vowel in each syllable. The range was also calculated over the voiced portion of the first vowel in each syllable.

Generic image for table
TABLE II.

Experiment 1: Gender adaptation pooled F0 present and F0 removed percent “female” response difference scores comparing each gender and F0 adaptation condition to the neutral control. The difference scores for each talker and morph level were compared using analysis of variance, resulting in the P-values and significance indicators in the columns labeled “p value.” a

Generic image for table
TABLE III.

Experiment 2: Fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequency (F1–F3) midpoint and range (in parentheses) in Hertz (Hz) for F0 present expressive adaptors. Midpoint measurements were defined as the median of the five values surrounding the midpoint of the voiced portion of the first vowel in each syllable. The range was also calculated over the voiced portion of the first vowel in each syllable.

Generic image for table
TABLE IV.

Expressive adaptation pooled F0 present and F0 removed percent “angry” response difference scores comparing each expressive and F0 adaptation condition to the neutral control. The difference scores for each talker and morph level were compared using analysis of variance, resulting in the p-values and significance indicators in the columns labeled “p value. b

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/content/asa/journal/jasa/133/4/10.1121/1.4792145
2013-04-03
2014-04-20
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Perceptual adaptation to gender and expressive properties in speech: The role of fundamental frequency
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/asa/journal/jasa/133/4/10.1121/1.4792145
10.1121/1.4792145
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