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/content/asa/journal/jasa/139/1/10.1121/1.4939608
2016-01-11
2016-12-05

Abstract

This study examined three ways that perception of non-native phones may be uncategorized relative to native (1) categories: focalized (predominantly similar to a single 1 category), clustered (similar to > 2 1 categories), and dispersed (not similar to any 1 categories). In an online study, Egyptian Arabic speakers residing in Egypt categorized and rated all Australian English vowels. Evidence was found to support focalized, clustered, and dispersed uncategorized assimilations. Second-language (2) category formation for uncategorized assimilations is predicted to depend upon the degree of perceptual overlap between the sets of 1 categories listeners use in assimilating each phone within an 2 contrast.

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