1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
Study of the room temperature molecular memory observed from a nanowell device
Rent:
Rent this article for
USD
10.1116/1.1931687
/content/avs/journal/jvsta/23/4/10.1116/1.1931687
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/avs/journal/jvsta/23/4/10.1116/1.1931687
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

(a) Nanowell device. (b) Three different molecules tested in the nanowell test device. Molecule 1 is an OPE molecule with one nitro side group. Molecule 2 is an OPE molecule with two nitro side groups. Molecule 3 is an OPE molecule with no nitro side groups. The acetate moieties were removed by acid treatment to produce the free thiols for assembly.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Cyclic voltammograms for different monolayers on gold: bare Au, Molecule 1, and an alkanethiol.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

(a) Plot of current vs negative voltage for a typical nitro device. Trace 1 shows a high conductivity state (the arrows indicate that the trace is occurring from 0 V outward on the negative voltage side) that then switches to a low conductivity state at . During Trace 2, the current remains in this low conductivity state. (b) A plot of current vs positive and negative voltage for a typical nitro device: Once the current is traced to in Trace 3, the current switches back to a high conductivity state. Trace 4 shows a repeat sweep of the positive voltage side after the switch to high conductivity, where the current holds the high conductivity state. The current will remain in the high conductivity state until the opposite threshold voltage, , is applied.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

(a) Plot of current vs voltage for Molecule 1. Trace 1 shows voltage applied from 0 to where the current switches from a high to a low conductivity state at . Trace 2 is from 0 to and holds the low conductivity state. Trace 3 shows a trace from 0 to where the current switches from low to high conductivity at and is followed by a repeat trace from 0 to (Trace 4) that holds the high conductivity state. (b) Additional results for Molecule 1. Trace 1 shows voltage applied from 0 to where a switch from high to low conductivity can be observed at . This trace is followed by the repeat trace from 0 to (Trace 2) that holds the low conductivity state. Trace 3 shows a trace from 0 to where a change to the high conductivity state occurs at . Trace 4 shows a repeat trace from 0 to where the high conductivity state is held.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

(a) Plot of current vs voltage for Molecule 2: Trace 1 shows a trace from 0 to where the current switches from a high to a low conductivity state at . Trace 2 is from 0 to and holds the low conductivity state. Trace 3 shows a trace from 0 to where the current switches from low to high conductivity at and is followed by a repeat trace from 0 to (Trace 4) that holds the high conductivity state. (b) Additional results for Molecule 2. Trace 1 shows voltage applied from 0 to where a switch from high to low conductivity can be observed at . This trace is followed by the repeat trace from 0 to (Trace 2) that holds the low conductivity state. Trace 3 shows a trace from 0 to where a change to the high conductivity state occurs at .

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Plot of current vs voltage for Molecule 3. Voltage is traced from 0 to where the current significantly increases in magnitude. Trace 2 shows voltage applied from 0 to . No switching or NDR peaks were observed. This rectifying behavior was reversible and the application of higher voltages resulted in irreversible electrical breakdown.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/avs/journal/jvsta/23/4/10.1116/1.1931687
2005-06-27
2014-04-17
Loading

Full text loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Study of the room temperature molecular memory observed from a nanowell device
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/avs/journal/jvsta/23/4/10.1116/1.1931687
10.1116/1.1931687
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM