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Damage of ultralow materials during photoresist mask stripping process
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10.1116/1.2194947
/content/avs/journal/jvstb/24/3/10.1116/1.2194947
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/avs/journal/jvstb/24/3/10.1116/1.2194947

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Schematic of the gap structure. Samples placed in the region shielded by the roof primarily interact with neutrals, the remote plasma processing regime. For samples placed in the plasma exposed region, low energy ion bombardment assists in the plasma-surface interaction.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

(a) Damage thickness as a function of process time of , , or discharges; (b) Influence of porosity on damage layer thickness after of either or discharge treatments. Discharges were generated using a source power of , pressure , and total gas flow rate . Damage thickness was determined with the 1% HF dipping method and ellipsometry.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Process efficiency defined as NPS damage thickness per nanometer photoresist removal for different direct discharges examined in this work. Discharges were generated with source power , pressure , and total gas flow rate .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

and intensities obtained using XPS with plasma-treated NPS films as a function of process time. Results for direct , , or plasma treatments are shown. Carbon depletion and densification are observed for all ashing processes. Discharges were generated with source power , pressure , and total gas flow rate .

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Time-of-flight (TOF) SIMS depth profiles of OSG(a) and three-2% NPS (b) material after direct plasma exposure employing . The intensities obtained with untreated materials are shown for comparison. Discharges were generated with source power , pressure , and total gas flow rate .

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Thickness of damaged layers produced in NPS materials as a result of remote plasma exposures using , , or discharges. Discharges were generated with at a source power level of , pressure of , and total gas flow rate of .

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Effect of substrate temperature on removed photoresist thickness and nanoporous ULK material damage layer thickness after exposure to a remote plasma. Discharges were generated using source power, a pressure of , and a total gas flow rate of .

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

(a) and (b) XPS spectra obtained with 32% NPS films after either exposure to remote or plasmas. The substrate temperature was maintained at . For comparison, XPS data obtained with an untreated NPS film are also shown. Discharges were generated using source power, a pressure of , and a total gas flow rate of .

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Dynamic SIMS depth profiles of 32% NPS materials after exposure to remote (a) or (b) plasmas at a substrate temperature of . For comparison, dynamic SIMS data obtained with an untreated NPS film are also shown. Discharges were generated using source power, a pressure of , and a total gas flow rate of .

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Cross-sectional images of NPS films obtained by TEM. (a) untreated; (b) after exposure to a remote plasma at a substrate temperature of ; (c) after exposure to a remote plasma at a substrate temperature of . Discharges were generated using source power, a pressure of , and a total gas flow rate of .

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

RMS roughness results obtained by AFM measurements employing NPS films exposed to and remote plasma ashing processes. An untreated control is shown for comparison. Discharges were generated using source power, a pressure of , and a total gas flow rate of .

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy images of NPS trench-structures after (a) directional etching using C4F8∕90%Ar and employing a self-bias voltage of ; (b) remote discharge ashing; (c) remote discharge ashing. Discharges were generated using source power, a pressure of , and a total gas flow rate of .

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE I.

Dielectric constants and porosity of the materials used in this work. Toluene x-ray reflectivity porosimetry indicates overall porosity while the value revealed with perfluorohexane x-ray reflectivity porosimetry is believed to provide a measure of the proportion of interconnected pores.

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/content/avs/journal/jvstb/24/3/10.1116/1.2194947
2006-04-24
2014-04-18
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Damage of ultralow k materials during photoresist mask stripping process
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/avs/journal/jvstb/24/3/10.1116/1.2194947
10.1116/1.2194947
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