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Interaction of NiSi with dopants for metallic source/drain applications
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10.1116/1.3248267
/content/avs/journal/jvstb/28/1/10.1116/1.3248267
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/avs/journal/jvstb/28/1/10.1116/1.3248267

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Variation in sheet resistance with silicidation temperature with different C or N implantation doses.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

XRD diffractograms of the Ni-silicide films formed at temperatures ranging from for (a) reference with neither C nor N, (b) samples implanted with C to , and (c) samples implanted with N to .

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

XTEM images of NiSi films formed at for (a) reference with neither C nor N, (b) sample implanted with N to , and (c) sample implanted with C to . The NiSi is measured thick in both (a) and (b), and thick in (c).

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

SIMS depth profile of the specified implanted species for samples implanted with (a) C and (b) N, both to a dose of .

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Top-view SEM images of NiSi films formed at showing (a) void formation (dark patches) in reference with neither C nor N, (b) spectacular surface for sample implanted with C, and (c) spectacular surface for sample implanted with N.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

vs silicidation temperature for samples implanted with either C or N.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

characteristics for the same samples in Fig. 6 that were first implanted with (a) C and (b) N, both to a dose of , and then silicided at different temperatures. As a comparison, the curve of a reference with the NiSi formed at without C or N is included (noted as “Ref., ”).

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

vs drive-in annealing temperature for samples first implanted with C or N, followed by silicidation at , and then underwent the B-DS process at different drive-in temperatures.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

characteristics for the same samples as in Fig. 8 that were first implanted with (a) C and (b) N, both to a dose of , followed by silicidation at , and then underwent the B-DS process at different drive-in annealing temperatures.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

vs drive-in annealing temperature for samples first implanted with C or N, followed by silicidation at , and then underwent the As-DS process at different drive-in temperatures.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

characteristics for the same samples as in Fig. 10 that first implanted with (a) C and (b) N, both to a dose of , followed by silicidation at , and then underwent the As-DS process at different drive-in annealing temperatures.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

SIMS depth profile of B (a) and As (b) in the presence of N (implantation dose: ). The upper curves represent the depth profile of Si. For B, the annealing behavior is compared to a reference without annealing (as ). For As, the behavior is also compared to a reference sample in the absence of N (Ref.).

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE I.

Schottky barrier height for electron, , Schottky barrier height for hole, , specific resistivity, , melting point, , and typical formation temperature, , for the suicides of low SBH. DDS: dominant diffusion species during the silicide growth; DCG: diffusion controlled growth; NCG: nucleation controlled growth. For comparison, the properties of NiSi, the most widely used silicide for Ohmic contact in the state-of-the-art CMOS technology, are also shown at the bottom.

Generic image for table
TABLE II.

for samples implanted with either C or N, followed by silicidation at different temperatures.

Generic image for table
TABLE III.

for samples first implanted with either C or N, followed by silicidation at , and then finished by B and drive-in anneal at different temperatures.

Generic image for table
TABLE IV.

for samples first implanted with either C or N, followed by silicidation at , and then finished by As and drive-in anneal at different temperatures.

Generic image for table
TABLE V.

Summary of the best achieved SBHs for NiSi modified using different methods, SP (surface passivation), DS (dopant segregation), and alloying. The result for “pure” NiSi is shown at the bottom as a reference. : current-voltage at various temperatures; : current-voltage; : capacitance voltage.

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/content/avs/journal/jvstb/28/1/10.1116/1.3248267
2010-03-04
2014-04-19
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Interaction of NiSi with dopants for metallic source/drain applications
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/avs/journal/jvstb/28/1/10.1116/1.3248267
10.1116/1.3248267
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